Image of Tone Deaf Festival: Bridget St. John (UK/NYC) & Joyful Joyful (Toronto)
  • Image of Tone Deaf Festival: Bridget St. John (UK/NYC) & Joyful Joyful (Toronto)
  • Image of Tone Deaf Festival: Bridget St. John (UK/NYC) & Joyful Joyful (Toronto)
  • Image of Tone Deaf Festival: Bridget St. John (UK/NYC) & Joyful Joyful (Toronto)

Tone Deaf Festival: Bridget St. John (UK/NYC) & Joyful Joyful (Toronto)

$10.00



Kingston's annual festival of adventurous sound performance, Tone Deaf, and The Live Wire Music Series are pleased to co-present a special evening with legendary British folk musician, Bridget St. John and Toronto/Peterborough chamber drone artists, Joyful Joyful.

Performing in Ontario for only the second time in 42 years(!), Bridget St. John made her first demo with help from celebrated folk musician, John Martyn – on a Revox owned by Al Stewart. Within weeks, she had recorded her first BBC radio broadcast for John Peel’s eclectic BBC program “Night Ride.” Following additional radio, TV, and live performances, Bridget signed to Peel and partner Clive Selwood’s record label “Dandelion” in 1969. Bridget’s three records for Dandelion, Ask Me No Questions, Songs for the Gentle Man, and Thank You For..., established her as major voice in folk music and mainstay of the UK’s booming college and club circuit in the early-1970s. Bridget has recorded with Mike Oldfield, Kevin Ayers, Bill Wells, Elisa Randazzo, Phosphene, Taku Hayashi, David Nagler, and Michael Chapman. She continues to write and perform. 2019, in particular, has included a two-week tour with Michael Chapman, and performances at Barcelona’s Primavera Sound Festival, the Strangewaves Festival in Paris, Ontario, The Green Man Festival, the 50th anniversary of David Bowie’s Beckenham Arts Festival, and a return to London, UK’s Betsey Trowood for the UK release of her first live vinyl LP: Live at the Betsey Trotwood.

Joyful Joyful are a Peterborough/Toronto-based duo whose strange and beautiful soundscapes have been quietly attracting notice since they began performing four years ago. Drawing on traditional, sacred, and experimental music, Joyful Joyful doesn’t sound like anything else. Their performances are unsettling, humane, and hopeful. A thicket of cables and effects transforms a single, visceral voice into a shimmering and otherworldly chorus, making Joyful Joyful’s dense drone-hymns at once sorrowful, soaring, and deeply moving.